Amiram Goldblum

S. El-Atawneh, S. Hirsch, R. Hadar, J. Tam, and A. Goldblum. 2020. “Erratum: Prediction and experimental confirmation of novel peripheral cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonists (J. Chem. Inf. Model. (2019) 59:9 (3996-4006) DOI: 10.1021/acs.jcim.9b00577).” Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, 60, 10, Pp. 5282. Publisher's Version Abstract
In Section 3.1. “Characteristics of the Models”, page 4000, eq 1 of the “Enrichment Factor” should be (Equation presented). © 2020 American Chemical Society.
B. Da'Adoosh, K. Kaito, K. Miyashita, M. Sakaguchi, and A. Goldblum. 2020. “Computational design of substrate selective inhibition.” PLoS Computational Biology, 16, 3. Publisher's Version Abstract
Most enzymes act on more than a single substrate. There is frequently a need to block the production of a single pathogenic outcome of enzymatic activity on a substrate but to avoid blocking others of its catalytic actions. Full blocking might cause severe side effects because some products of that catalysis may be vital. Substrate selectivity is required but not possible to achieve by blocking the catalytic residues of an enzyme. That is the basis of the need for "Substrate Selective Inhibitors" (SSI), and there are several molecules characterized as SSI. However, none have yet been designed or discovered by computational methods. We demonstrate a computational approach to the discovery of Substrate Selective Inhibitors for one enzyme, Prolyl Oligopeptidase (POP) (E.C 3.4.21.26), a serine protease which cleaves small peptides between Pro and other amino acids. Among those are Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone (TRH) and Angiotensin-III (Ang-III), differing in both their binding (Km) and in turnover (kcat). We used our in-house "Iterative Stochastic Elimination" (ISE) algorithm and the structure-based "Pharmacophore" approach to construct two models for identifying SSI of POP. A dataset of  1.8 million commercially available molecules was initially reduced to less than 12,000 which were screened by these models to a final set of 20 molecules which were sent for experimental validation (five random molecules were tested for comparison). Two molecules out of these 20, one with a high score in the ISE model, the other successful in the pharmacophore model, were confirmed by in vitro measurements. One is a competitive inhibitor of Ang-III (increases its Km), but non-competitive towards TRH (decreases its Vmax). © 2020 Da'adoosh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
S. El-Atawneh, S. Hirsch, R. Hadar, J. Tam, and A. Goldblum. 2019. “Prediction and Experimental Confirmation of Novel Peripheral Cannabinoid-1 Receptor Antagonists.” Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, 59, 9, Pp. 3996-4006. Publisher's Version Abstract
Small molecules targeting peripheral CB1 receptors have therapeutic potential in a variety of disorders including obesity-related, hormonal, and metabolic abnormalities, while avoiding the psychoactive effects in the central nervous system. We applied our in-house algorithm, iterative stochastic elimination, to produce a ligand-based model that distinguishes between CB1R antagonists and random molecules by physicochemical properties only. We screened ∼2 million commercially available molecules and found that about 500 of them are potential candidates to antagonize the CB1R. We applied a few criteria for peripheral activity and narrowed that set down to 30 molecules, out of which 15 could be purchased. Ten out of those 15 showed good affinity to the CB1R and two of them with nanomolar affinities (Ki of ∼400 nM). The eight molecules with top affinities were tested for activity: two compounds were pure antagonists, and five others were inverse agonists. These molecules are now being examined in vivo for their peripheral versus central distribution and subsequently will be tested for their effects on obesity in small animals. © 2019 American Chemical Society.